10 Home Remedies for Diaper Rash

Home Remedies for Diaper Rash
Home Remedies for Diaper Rash

After changing many diapers, going through childbirth (or the adoption process), and waking up to a hungry baby at 2 a.m., the challenge of home remedies for diaper rash may seem a bit overwhelming. Most parents believe that it only occurs when a diaper isn’t changed promptly, and wetness from urine or loose stools can indeed by the culprit. However,

BabyCenter.com claims that there are diverse causes unrelated to the contents of the actual diaper.

For example, you should be wary of fragrances in diapers, as some babies are sensitive not only to chaffing but also to certain chemicals. Different foods introduced into the diet can also cause the rash by altering the acidity level and breakdown of food. Even antibiotics can cause diaper rash by promoting yeast infections.

If your baby’s diaper rash appears without new external factors, try the following home remedies for diaper rash.

1. Marigold and rosemary

Home remedy experts suggest washing the area with marigold ointment, reducing inflammation. Rosemary (oil or infusion) can also be used to clean the area. However, rosemary does have a tendency to dry out the skin.

2. Egg whites

Egg whites can aid in the healing process, but be sure to let them dry on the affected area before putting on another diaper.

3. Cloth diapers and aromatherapy

Aromatherapy probably sounds like a great idea when talking about diapers in general, and some essential oils contain healing remedies! For example, if you decide to switch to cloth diapers when your baby has diaper rash, try putting drops of tea tree oil into the rinse cycle to disinfect the diapers.

4. Lavender and rose essential oils

These oils work in a similar fashion to tea tree oil, but organic lavender and rose oils can be placed directly on the affected area. Some people combine these oils with a peach kernel carrier oil to prevent future diaper rash. These items may not be available in your local grocery store, but essential oils are always available online or through local business websites.

5. Live yogurt

The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Home Remedies swears by this folk remedy because live yogurt contains healthy bacteria that can fight off infection. “Live yogurt can be spread on the diaper area to soothe, and to prevent thrush [yeast infection] from occurring in the folds of the skin.”

6. Sulfur

Sulfur can help with dry skin, and it is also a traditional cure for infection. The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Home Remedies states that “sulfur can be used to soothe hot, red, itchy skin associated with problems such as eczema and diaper rash, digestive complaints […] and hunger pangs.” Many of these natural healing remedies have multiple uses.

7. Chamomile Tea & Buchu

Calming drinks like diluted chamomile tea can reduce the amount of acidity in the urine. In herbalism, buchu (made from dried leaves) provides the same solution.

8. Rhus tox

Homeopathic beliefs revolve around the idea that like cures like—in very small dosages. Rhus tox is actually made from poison ivy, and it somehow helps skin conditions! Homeopathic remedies should always be made by the experts, so don’t try to pick up poison ivy in your backyard.

9. Avocado

Avocado items can be found in many households and can be applied directly to the inflamed area in order to soothe the skin.

10. Call Your Pediatrician

Although these home remedies are extremely effective, there are still instances when you may wish to seek medical attention for your child. For example, cases of diaper rash may require a mild steroid cream or anti-fungal ointment. Whattoexpect.com claims that you should contact your pediatrician “if the rash doesn’t appear to get better in two or three days, or if blisters or pustules appear.”

Keep in mind that most remedies in Western medicine are derived from the natural world. Anti-inflammatory natural home remedies may help with the rash, but steroids are actually hormones. Therefore, when it comes to the health of your baby, it may be better to resist experimenting at home if the condition becomes more serious.